Out of the Blue

Vega, a being of light and energy, stretched her mind towards the pale blue dot. She liked to call it that, ever since hearing the expression from one who joined the Infinitum only recently. If only all the dot’s inhabitants were as enlightened as he, there would be no need for this vigil.

 
“Why are we doing this again?” she asked.  “We checked them last century.  Remember? They figured out nuclear fission and used it to kill millions of their own kind. What makes you think they’re ready now?”

 
The Infinitum had watched this particular planet ever since the first terrestrial asked the question, “Why am I here?”  That question, plucked from the ether by those whose duty it was to watch over the cosmos for signs of self-awareness, triggered a vigil.  To Vega, it seemed as though the inhabitants of this particular planet had come no closer to achieving enlightenment than they had in a thousand years.

 
“They have made many good technological advances since we visited them last,” Polaris said.  “At the very least, I’m thinking we need to keep a closer eye on them.  Those contraptions they sent out could have brought them more trouble than they realise.”

 

“But they didn’t.” Vega groaned.  This was all so tedious.

 
“Not yet,” Polaris said. “The device has left their system. What if it attracts the wrong kind of attention before it breaks down?  They could be set back thousands of years.”
“They haven’t exactly come very far since the last instance of outside interference,” Sirius grumbled.  “Several thousand years and they’re still fighting over who he likes best.”

 

Vega signalled her agreement.  The Infinitum had gone to great pains to remove the renegade, but his influence remained even now. If not for him, the inhabitants of the pale blue dot might not have come to believe that their world—and by default the universe in which it existed—had been created especially for them.

 
“They are obviously not ready, Vega said.  “Look at them now, killing each other over fossils while others die of thirst.  How can we trust them with the secrets of the universe when we can’t even trust them not destroy themselves”

 
Arcturus chuckled loudly and if Vega had possessed eyes she would have rolled them. “Oh, we could go round and round on that question for eons,” he said. “But look at this.  It gives me hope, at least.”

 
The Infinitum focused their consciousness on Arcturus, whose vision zoomed in to where a pod of Blue Whales swam in the depths of a vast ocean.  As though sensing a presence, the whales raised their gaze skyward, a cacophony of questions tumbling from their minds.

 
“Oh my,” Vega said.  “I had almost forgotten about them. So wise and gentle.  Perhaps the pale blue dot has something to offer after all.”